science journalist and photographer Amelia Jaycen


Amelia Jaycen is a journalist covering physics, energy, materials, engineering and ocean technology.

You’ll find articles across the spectrum of Arctic research, climate change, energy, technology and more.


X-Ray Vision: Berkeley’s High-Speed Electrons Fuel Atomic-Scale Science
BERKELEY, California—A group of eager writers attending the World Conference of Science Journalists 2017 stood on an upper platform at Berkeley’s Advanced Light
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The Dawn of Gallium Oxide Microelectronics
WASHINGTON, D.C., February 6, 2018– Silicon has long been the go-to material in the world of microelectronics and semiconductor technology.
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Deep Dive into Engineering the World’s Most Advanced ROV System
In August 2017 a research group led by explorer and philanthropist Paul G. Allen used ultra-high-tech underwater equipment to locate
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From Dinosaurs to Data Networks: Texas and the Arctic in the Anthropocene
“Report from the Top of the World!” The flier caught my attention immediately. The U.S. Embassy in Oslo and the
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Marvin Minsky, computing pioneer, cognitive scientist, and a founding father of artificial intelligence known for his relentless ambition and forward
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Augmenting NASA’s Mars Simulation for the Health of Astronauts
Eight-thousand, two-hundred feet above sea level on the northern slope of Mauna Loa in a place surrounded by the barren, lava-rock
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Coding: The Creative Medium of Our Time
Ira Greenberg treats himself like a computer. His is the art + science of using coding as a paintbrush and exploring
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The Most Pressing Problem in VR
If you’re following VR, you’re probably hearing a lot about presence. But what is it? The definition is elusive. Presence
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A Delicate Dance between East and West
This BBC report live from Kirkenes in the High North of Norway talks about Russia-NATO relations, hundreds of refugees on
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The History Behind Texas Coal Power
ANDERSON — Straddling a dammed-up creek 20 miles east of College Station squats the Gibbons Creek Steam Electric Station, a
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